Tag Archives: brands

A Great British Brand

Like many strong brands, Russell Brand divides opinion. It’s easy to deride him. Just choose your epithet. Libidinous lightweight. Naive dilettante. Political poseur. Amoral chancer. Degenerate Essex Boy. You can belittle him but it’s difficult to ignore him. As a degenerate Essex boy myself, I like him. He’s a great British brand that others could learn from. Read more on A Great British Brand…

Making magic

The Super Bowl was a couple of weeks ago now. Was it all that you hoped? Did you laugh your socks off? Do you even remember any of the ads? With all of the hype and the huge price tag attached, it’s not surprising that there’s been a lot of discussion about whether or not it’s worth it. So, is it worth it?

Read more on Making magic…

Tease ’em and please ’em?

If, in years gone by, you’ve read my blog around this time of year, you’ll know that I rather enjoy the festival that is the Super Bowl. The ads – great or terrible – are always talking points, whether you’re part of the advertising tribe or part of the audience. So, if the Super Bowl is an advertising holiday, then it is also a reflection of the shifting media landscape, a petri dish where we see not only creative that is worthy of being called ‘creative’ but also a microcosm of that shifting world of brand and comms. Read more on Tease ’em and please ’em?…

Read more on Tease ’em and please ’em?…

New Year, new … everything?

2014_wishes_454031375Ah New Year, that festive time of regretting everything you ate and drank over the previous month. That time to set new targets and reinvent yourself as someone thinner, fitter, better at saving, in fact just generally better.

Cue the commercials showing slim people running and cycling.

But what about your brand and communications? Do they, too, have New Year’s resolutions? Perhaps they should, even if your planning cycle is long past.

Here are some suggestions: Read more on New Year, new … everything?…

Teach yourself advertising

My parents were both primary school teachers. It’s a noble profession and teachers earn much less than doctors, lawyers and other professionals. I was a teacher once too. The lack of a decent salary was the main reason I left and decided to use my love of words and ideas in the somewhat less noble profession of marketing. I confess that I’ve never looked back particularly wistfully at my life in front of the whiteboard. Read more on Teach yourself advertising…

Whatever’s (Southern) Comfortable

Tara Beard-Knowland of Ipsos ASI looks at Southen Comfort’s latest Whatever’s Comfortable ad and the challenge for brands who want to communicate in a more emotional way.

Under the Influence


Usually I find Klout perks quite lame, especially for those of us not based in the US. My highlight so far had been a ‘digital lottery ticket to play and share with friends’. But I have to admit that I did get quite excited when I read that my social media influence could be exchanged for free beer (well, for access to American Airlines’ business class lounge, including free wi-fi and free beer).  The airline is now offering those people with a Klout score of 55 or above a one-day pass to their fancy Admirals Club in 40 different airports. Perks also include snacks, showers to ‘unwind and relax’ and more importantly, the feel-good factor of climbing up the ladder of influence.

One can argue how accurate Klout is and if it means anything at all. There was an interesting article on Wired a while ago about Calvin Lee, a graphic designer from L.A, who, in order to keep his score up would tweet up to 45 times a day, to the extreme of worrying about his Klout score going down while on holiday. Lee’s current Klout score is 73 and yes, he has already claimed his AA lounge perk – instagraming it on the way. If we look at Lee’s Klout score and compare it with, let’s say, Warren Buffet’s, 61, does that mean Lee is more influential than Mr. Buffet? Read more on Under the Influence…

Life changing brands

Over the weekend, I was discussing with my husband and some friends whether or not the author William Gibson was a prophet, especially as relates to technologies like Google Glass. Where does the influence lie? Is it that these technologies were already nascent and Gibson heard about them? Or is it that clever and inventive people read books like Gibson’s (and others’) and make things happen? Is it the chicken? Or the egg? Read more on Life changing brands…

Graphing Likes

With big data comes great responsibility. This is what Spider-Man* might have said if he was working for Facebook these days. Facebook has the personal information, photos and likes of over a billion people with more than a trillion connections. That’s a lot of data, so no wonder that privacy concerns are mounting since Facebook announced its new Graph Search a couple of weeks ago, which uses everything we have been sharing on Facebook to let us look up people, places or photos, packaging it into structured information we can actually use.

This is like Google but instead of giving you links to external sites, results are Facebook pages for the people, places or things that match your query, making the search more personal than a traditional search engine. For example, you could search ‘restaurants my friends who live in Dublin like’ to get a list of places to eat in Dublin your friends ‘liked’, look for ‘friends that work at my company who like karaoke’ if you’re looking for a singing partner in crime or ‘new movies my friends like’ if you don’t know what to watch. This all sounds very exciting, but it can also be a bit scary, as Tom Scott’s Tumblr Actual Facebook Graph Searches shows. Read more on Graphing Likes…

Appy New Year!

Like many people, on 1st of January I found myself  with a considerable hangover writing my New Year resolutions’ list. Over a quarter of people in the UK make New Year resolutions, probably calling on the ‘New Year, new me’ mantra, vowing to lose weight, run 5K, spend more time with their family or like me, quit smoking.  However, good intentions alone are not enough, as a not very encouraging study from Bristol University found, around three quarters of those who make resolutions fail.

I have tried to stick to my resolutions before, but they have never lasted past the second half of January. This year I am determined to avoid failure, be smoke free and live happily ever after. Experts agree that writing down resolutions, tracking your progress and sharing goals with others can help you achieve them. Fortunately for me, there is an app for that – or more accurately, over 200 apps promising to help me succeed in my quest to quit. Read more on Appy New Year!…

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